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Homeless, Dhaka Bangladesh

homeless kids Homeless, Dhaka Bangladesh

120 x 180 cm
www.thefaketory.org
photograhy by: Martijn Crowe

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Homeless homeless stories

What you learn about humanity from living on the streets

Passers-by mainly ignore me, a homeless woman sitting on the sidewalk or a bench. The people who do speak to me are either curious, or harpies who give me unsolicited and useless advice, or the more irritable who chastise me. I try to explain by example that there are good, decent, employable but destitute people in New York City. Read more. 

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Homeless homeless stories

A big chicken in the pot

Paul is a civil engineer in his fifities who lost his job in 2009 due to a down-sizing event at his company.  For years he had worked successfully on many major construction projects that are well known throughout Central Florida. Read more.

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Homeless homeless stories

Stories of Hope and Courage

Twelve years ago, Santos arrived in Central Florida from Puerto Rico. He had heard of a job opportunity and decided to pursue it. It never materialized.  He quickly learned that being alone without resources in an unfamiliar city was not a comfortable situation to be in. Read more. 

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Homeless homeless stories

Incredible Story of a Homeless Man Who Risked His Life For a Stranger

Colorado has a large population of homeless people. If you’re driving in the metro area, you will probably see a homeless man or woman on the corner of nearly every block. My sister drives the same route home every day, getting off the 1-25 highway and exiting onto Colorado Blvd., a large street with about four lanes of traffic on each side of the median. Read more.

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Homeless homeless stories

Teenager’s Story Of Homelessness To Harvard

Dawn grew up in a less-than-ideal situation, to say the least. Her house had no electricity or running water, so she was forced to do her homework in the dark and go days, even weeks, without showering. She lived with parents who abused drugs. Read more here.

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Homeless homeless stories

How 1 dad inspires teenagers to make 33,000 burritos for the homeless

It all started during the 2010 holiday season when Alec Johnson, then 12, gave his parents a fairly lavish Christmas wish list. “I asked for an iPad, iPhone and MacBook.” He says his dad was surprised and said, “I would never buy that for you because all the other people on the street could never get that.” Read more here. 

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Homeless homeless stories

I Was Homeless: How It Happened, and How I Got Out

homelesslogo7 150x150 I Was Homeless: How It Happened, and How I Got OutI was born in Nigeria, and contrary to the prevalent view of Africa, I had a good life. My father was a high-ranking politician and my mother earned so much running a chicken farm that she out-earned my father. Read more here. 

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Homeless homeless stories

3 Lessons That Got Me Out of Homelessness

homeless3 150x150 3 Lessons That Got Me Out of HomelessnessAndy Andrews is a New York Times best-selling author and speaker. He’s spoken in front of four U.S. presidents and Zig Ziglar described him as “the best speaker I have ever seen.” But he wasn’t always that way. In fact, he was homeless when he started his career. Read more here.

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Homeless homeless stories

City shuts down soup kitchen

soup 142x150 City shuts down soup kitchenStockholm’s traffic office rejected the application on Monday for Soup Kitchen Stockholm, which for the past two years has offered food to the homeless around the Stockholm square of Medborgarplatsen. Read more here.

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Art homeless stories

Homeless in Bangkok

When you search for information on homeless people in Bangkok, you will find the astonishing figure of about 2000 homeless. In an Asian city with 50 million people, that is close to nothing.  And it is true, there are a lot of beggars, but it is unclear if they live on the street. You don’t see that much people sleeping on the streets. Especially you don’t see them in the touristic areas. So it is even unclear if they are not there because of some kind of city policy and police control, or that they are simply not there. Honest enough, the streets are crowded and the traffic is the worst in the world, but the streets are clean and well maintained.
As is stated in newspapers (www.nationmultimedia.com and www.globalvoicesonline.org) these 2000 people are helped, one way or the other, giving the impression that only those who really don’t want to have a home, stay on the street. Building special asylums is reported frequently in the newspapers. The Issarachon foundation (www.Issarachon.org) is one of the leading foundations that help the homeless. “The foundation focuses on the individual effected and aims to rehabilitate the feelings of families, communities and surrounding environment. Members of the foundation visit effected ‘homeless’ individuals and families, encourage them to discuss and talk about their feelings and work to find reasons for leaving home, to find ways to improve their quality of life and also the work of the organization.”
The group of homeless itself is as complex as anywhere in the world. Be it depressed people, children, alcoholics, mental patients and sex-workers. A special group of about an estimated 800 homeless in Thailand are expatriates, people from America and Europa, mostly white men with visa problems or alcoholics. Shame seems to be a good reason to stay on the street. Homeless are ashamed about their situation and don’t want to go back to their families.

But be it true or not, it might be a question of definition. In the slums and shanti towns there are too many of people living under circumstances you can’t call a house. An estimated 400.000 people live in these slums, at the river waterfront, along the tracks of the railways, having trains passing a meter from their shacks and shelters. Even here there is complexity at hand. It’s not only for low income reasons people stay in the slums. Avoiding the traffic from and to their villages by people selling fruit stay there, and taxi and tuctuc drivers stay there, close to their work. Especially slums of the boathouses have a family tradition from way back that keeps the dwellers to their shanty boats. Klong Toey is a slum where people life that work in the harbor. The fight between the landowners and the shanty people is fierce. Landowners put parts of Klong Toey on fire and are even accused of chemically poisoning the inhabitants.
The beggars in the street are mostly from Laos or Cambodia. They came for work and stayed when they ran out of work. Any kind of social security is not accessible for this group. Most of them are women in their thirties or early forties accompanied with one or two children, mostly sleeping. They look clean and they seem not to suffer from hunger and are easy to speak to, not showing any aggression when you try to make contact. Of course in every tourist guide it is said that there are beggar gangs and that the actual beggars don’t get the money. But this kind of stories I even heard in the shanty towns of Myanmar, where the leper beggars were said to be very rich but too greedy to spent their money.
And there is a group of beggars that have some kind of disability, missing legs, or arms or I even saw one missing both. They also look clean, even shaved and don’t smell. Approaching them was more difficult; I felt a kind of shame in them. Anyhow, a society should take care of this group, nobody chooses to be disabled. They are mostly men at the age of 40 and up.
Homeless foreigners I did not see. I only saw them in Phnom Penn. In general most of them were married or had a relation with a Thai. After the relation broke or for any other reason, they seemed to be more vulnerable to alcohol and lose their way in the bureaucratic process of going back home. When you want to leave Thailand, there is a special counter were you have to pay the fine for overstaying. If you don’t pay, they don’t let you out. And overstaying is almost a necessity. The corrupt process of keeping a visa is considered expensive and inhuman. Every year a new application has to be done, and in case a 40.000 Bath income per year cannot be proofed, the visa is refused. It is noted that the Thai police leaves them and is not aggressive against them. They even tried to attend the foreign embassies to them, but it is reported that they are not interested in helping their own citizens.

Martijn Crowe

 

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homeless stories

5000 Gorgeous Houses to Homeless

A very rich man 150x150 5000 Gorgeous Houses to HomelessMr.Smith who already has a beautiful house gave the same opportunity to 5000 homeless. After realizing what it means to live on the streets without food, warmth and roof, he decided  to contribute to the society by helping the people in need.  Read more.

 

 

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homeless stories

How I Fell in Love With a Homeless Man

Work 589 150x150 How I Fell in Love With a Homeless Man

This is a story showing how an accidental meeting with a homeless man can turn into a strong relationship.

Photography Martijn Crowe
Click here to read more

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homeless stories

Clifford Johnson Shares Experience Overcoming Homelessness, Addiction to Serve At-Risk Veterans

171 Clifford Johnson Shares Experience Overcoming Homelessness, Addiction to Serve At Risk VeteransClifford Johnson

Resiliency Instructor
Operation Sacred Trust

What inspires you to serve Veterans?

The fact that Veterans are selfless people who put their own lives on the line for our country.

What is a story/experience serving a Veteran family that stands out for you?

What stands out for me the most is a woman who came to Resiliency class several months ago who seemed to be at the edge of life. The tears that flowed out of her during the PAIRS Emptying the Emotional Jug exercise felt like they’d been there for years, maybe longer. Before the exercise, she told me that she felt that her pain was too much to express and that she had no one to confide in. Afterwards, it was as if a thousand pounds had been lifted from her body and spirit.260 Clifford Johnson Shares Experience Overcoming Homelessness, Addiction to Serve At Risk Veterans She had such a sense of relief, gratitude, and her despair became hope. I’ll never forget the appreciation in her hug, eyes or the smile that I suspect was her first in quite a long time. I was so grateful to have been able to serve her as a Veteran who had given so much of her life to serve our country.

What’s your hope for the impact your work at Operation Sacred Trust has on the lives of the Veterans you serve?

My hope is that no matter what a Veteran may be feeling and going through, they know there is someone who cares and that help is just a phone call away.

Beyond your work serving Veterans, what personal connections do you have with the military/VA community?

My father was a Korean War Veteran and my own experience with homelessness through drug abuse and overcoming addictions helps me have enormous empathy for the men and women we serve. My life experiences and all that I’ve overcome give me a personal connection with the emotional stress and feelings of despair many of our Veterans are going through when they reach Operation Sacred Trust. I love being of help.

357 300x205 Clifford Johnson Shares Experience Overcoming Homelessness, Addiction to Serve At Risk VeteransWhat’s one of the lessons you’ve learned from your work helping end homelessness for Veterans?

I learned that we, the American people, owe each of them our very best when they come home. Those who returned home many years ago from past wars need us too.

Source and to read more click here

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homeless stories

Fighting homelessness my way

Jamal 150x150 Fighting homelessness my wayAfter experiencing mainstream homeless shelters in Amsterdam and its surroundings, Jamal managed to get back on track, and no he has one advice – give a chance to people to help themselves.

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